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No. 11, Rhubarb, Ruibarbo blanco, Cedros [Jatropha podagrica Hooker, Euphorbiaceae], watercolor on paper by Charles Dorat (?1806–ca.1870), 30 × 23.5 cm, HI Art accession no. 5683.11.

Dr. Charles Dorat and His Unrealized Central American Medicinal Flora
Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation
Pittsburgh, PA
April 2 – June 29, 2018

Charles Dorat (?1806-ca.1870) was a European physician and naturalist who lived in El Salvador and traveled in Honduras between 1850 and 1870. Acquainted with Central American medical professionals, government officials and companies interested in material medica, it is thought Dorat was hired by companies because of his knowledge of mining and economic plants.

While in Central America, Dorat pursued interests in nature and art, and by 1860 had painted 150 watercolors of useful plants. These paintings were supposed to be published as a flora of Central America, but Dorat appears to have died around 1870.

Learn more about Dr. Charles Dorat at Dr. Charles Dorat and His Unrealized Central American Medicinal Flora.



About The Hunt Institute

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation. To this end, the Institute acquires and maintains authoritative collections of books, plant images, manuscripts, portraits and data files, and provides publications and other modes of information service. The Institute meets the reference needs of botanists, biologists, historians, conservationists, librarians, bibliographers and the public at large, especially those concerned with any aspect of the North American flora.

Scientific illustrator Kathleen McKeehen invites you to join her upcoming workshop on painting birds and feathers:


    Painting the Feather and the Bird!

    Greater Hansville Community Center
    Hansville, WA
    January 13-14, 2018

    Join us on the west side of Puget Sound for a bird/feather painting workshop using the classical dry-brush watercolor technique at the Hansville Community Center, 15 minutes from the Edmonds/Kingston ferry, located in the park at Buck Lake. All levels, including total beginners, are welcome; subject possibilities include bird specimens, (including feathers,) photos (the photographer has given permission to use for paintings), master studies from the “greats” of bird painting, or learn to compose your own bird portraits using various references for accuracy.

    Cost: $125.00, includes lunches and handouts

Email Kathleen McKeehen or call (360) 297-8858 to sign up or get more information.

Visit Kathleen’s website at www.florawithfauna.com.

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This year I had the opportunity to learn more about Henry R. Mockel, an East Coast artist known for his serigraphs of California desert plants. With this opportunity came the opportunity to speak with people who knew Henry, as well as opportunities to tell Henry’s story in a presentation for the Desert Institute at Joshua Tree National Park and to write a journal article for the Twentynine Palms Historical Society. This week I have the opportunity to share Henry’s story again, this time over afternoon tea.

This week’s presentation is one of several events celebrating the 65th anniversary of the 29 Palms Art Gallery. Henry was an early member of the Gallery and I look forward to sharing his story with a new audience, as well as with those who may have known him.

You are invited to join us for an afternoon of tea and botanical art on Saturday, December 9, 2017 from 3:00 – 5:00 pm. This event is free. Donations to the non-profit gallery are suggested.

The 29 Palms Art Gallery is located in Twentynine Palms, CA. Learn more about the Gallery at www.29palmsartgallery.com.


Gretchen Kai Halpert

www.gretchenhalpert.com
Gretchen Kai Halpert is the founder and instructor of an online program in scientific illustration. A graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design/CE, Gretchen has many years of experience working as a scientific illustrator and teaching programs about natural science illustration. Learn more about the distance learning program in scientific illustration at www.gretchenhalpert-distanceprogram.com.

    Gretchen Kai Halpert
    Scientific Illustration, Session I, Graphite

    January 9-March 13, 2018
    1:00-3:00 or 7:00-9:00 EST or email
    On-Line

    How do you take a three-dimensional object and translate it on to a two-dimensional plane? This course offers: basic scientific illustration drawing skills in graphite; perspective, proportion; value; textures; introduction to pen and ink; scientific conventions; lighting; transferring and scanning. It includes handouts; tutorials; live video conferencing; and email. Beginning and intermediate students.


    Gretchen Kai Halpert
    Scientific Illustration, Session II, Pen and Ink

    January 8-March 12, 2018
    1:00-3:00 or 7:00-9:00 EST or email

    Pen and Ink is a staple for scientific illustrators. This class gives you an opportunity to immerse yourself to proficiency. Pen and ink, crowquill, line and wash techniques, composition, scratchboard, anatomy, professional practices, final projects. It includes handouts; tutorials; live video conferencing; and email. Beginning and intermediate students.

View all classes at www.gretchenhalpert-distanceprogram.com

To register, download the registration form or contact ghalpert@stny.rr.com.

To receive the newsletter of the Scientific Illustration Distance Program, sign up at the website or email Gretchen.


This information can also be found at Classes Near You > New York.

Illustrator Christine Berrie has created a clever way to learn about plant families.

Flower Families: A Go Fish Game is a card game featuring 52 garden flowers that players must group into their respective plants families.

This game introduces players to the following taxonomic groups:

    Amaryllidaceae (Amaryllis Family)
    Ranunculaceae (Buttercup Family)
    Asteraceae (Daisy Family)
    Onagraceae (Evening Primrose Family)
    Iridaceae (Iris Family)
    Liliaceae (Lily Family)
    Malvaceae (Mallow Family)
    Lamiaceae (Mint Family)
    Brassicaceae (Mustard Family)
    Fabaceae (Pea Family)
    Caryophyllaceae (Pink Family)
    Plantaginaceae (Plantain Family)
    Rosaceae (Rose Family)

Included with the game is the booklet, Flower Families: A Guide to the Flower Families by Timothy Utteridge.

Published in the UK by Laurence King Publishing, this game is distributed in the US by Chronicle Books.


View Contents & Directions

By Vanessa Cantu, Hi-Desert Nature Museum

Nature’s Beloved Son
Rediscovering John Muir’s Botanical Legacy

Hi-Desert Nature Museum
Yucca Valley, CA
September 21 – December 16, 2017

In the spirit which John Muir embraced the botanical world, Nature’s Beloved Son traces his travels through North America and presents vivid images of the actual plants that Muir held in his hands, carried in his pockets, and preserved for all time.

Produced and toured by Exhibit Envoy in partnership with Bonnie J. Gisel, Stephen J. Joseph, Heyday Books, and the Bedford Gallery. This exhibition was supported by the Skirball Foundation and private donors. Students and faculty from the University of California, Davis Design School and Design Museum designed the exhibition.

The Hi-Desert Nature Museum is in the desert community of Yucca Valley, approximately 45 minutes northeast of Palm Springs and 15 minutes west of the Joshua Tree National Park Visitor Center in Joshua Tree.

We often assume that everyone can distinguish between a tree, bush, and herbaceous flowering plant but this is not always the case, especially when it comes to young learners.

Do you know how your youngest students think about plants?

If you’re not sure, consider using the “Is it a plant?” formative assessment probe presented in Uncovering Young Children’s Concept of a Plant, an article written by science education consultant and author, Page Keeley.

In her article, Keeley discusses how this probe was created “to elicit primary students’ initial ideas about plants and the characteristics they use to decide if something is a plant.”

The “Is it a plant?” assessment involves a single sheet of paper featuring simple illustrations of nine plant types — cactus, tree, grass, weed, bush, dandelion, water lily, vine, and fern. Students are asked to view the sheet and to select which of the illustrations represent a plant. They are then asked to share the reasons why they made the choices that they did. This probe leads to conversations between teachers and students about what a plant is and isn’t and provides educators with an opportunity to customize learning experiences that will expand their students’ understanding of plants.

View this assessment and find out how you can administer it yourself by purchasing Keeley’s article online from the journal Science and Children (99¢).


Literature Cited

Keeley, Page. (2017). Uncovering young children’s concept of a plant. Science and Children. 55(2): 20-22.



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