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By Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation presents
Exquisite Patterns in Nature from March 19 – June 30, 2017. This exhibition includes selections of artwork and books from the Hunt Institute’s permanent collections that are representative of, or inspired by, the fascinating configurations in the architecture of all organisms.

The patterns on display include simple symmetries and more complex tessellations and fractals; growth rings, whorls and logarithmic spirals; explorations of larger patterns observed through groupings of like plants and plant parts; the visual study of plants in complex decorative arrangements and examples of these patterns in practice.

    Opening reception
    Join us Sunday, March 19, 2017, 2-4 p.m. for the reception. At 2:30 p.m. the curators will give a short introduction to the exhibition in the gallery.

    Open House 2017
    Our annual Open House on Sunday, June 25 (1:45-4:30 p.m.) will include a talk (2:00-3:00 p.m.) and an exhibition tour (3:15-4:00 p.m.). Librarian Charlotte Tancin will present A celebration of plants, enjoying endless variety of form and kind, a talk and display from the Institute’s rare book collection. Striking historical illustrations of selected kinds of plants or aspects of their forms will be on display. She will talk briefly about each image, discussing what can be seen in the image and how the published image would have supported the work of botanists at the time, such as in floristic studies, reports of explorations, monographs on a family or genus, documenting new introductions or celebrating exotic garden plants. This event is free and open to the public.

[Insect- and wind-borne pollen of Dicotyledoneae and Monocotyledoneae], watercolor on paper by Anne Ophelia Todd Dowden (1907–2007), ca.1990, 25 × 17.5 cm, for her The Clover and the Bee: A Book of Pollination (New York, Thomas Crowell, 1990, p. 12), HI Art accession no. 7408.39, Rights, except gift industry, held by Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation.

[Insect- and wind-borne pollen of Dicotyledoneae and Monocotyledoneae], watercolor on paper by Anne Ophelia Todd Dowden (1907–2007), ca.1990, 25 × 17.5 cm, for her The Clover and the Bee: A Book of Pollination (New York, Thomas Crowell, 1990, p. 12), HI Art accession no. 7408.39, Rights, except gift industry, held by Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation.


About the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation. To this end, the Institute acquires and maintains authoritative collections of books, plant images, manuscripts, portraits and data files, and provides publications and other modes of information service. The Institute meets the reference needs of botanists, biologists, historians, conservationists, librarians, bibliographers and the public at large, especially those concerned with any aspect of the North American flora.

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Heath-leaved Banksia, Banksia ericifolia L.f. [Banksia ericifolia Linnaeus filius, Proteaceae], watercolor on paper by Julie Dagmar Nettleton (Australia), 2012, 38.5 x 57 cm, HI Art accession no. 8038, ©2012 Julie Dagmar Nettleton, All Rights Reserved.

Heath-leaved Banksia, Banksia ericifolia L.f. [Banksia ericifolia Linnaeus filius, Proteaceae], watercolor on paper by Julie Dagmar Nettleton (Australia), 2012, 38.5 x 57 cm, HI Art accession no. 8038, ©2012 Julie Dagmar Nettleton, All Rights Reserved.

14th International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration
Hunt Institute for
Botanical Documentation
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA
Sept. 27 – Dec. 19, 2013

Every three years the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation presents an exhibition of botanical art celebrating the work of contemporary botanical artists. This year forty-one artists from ten countries will take part in this international series that began in 1964 with the hope of supporting and encouraging contemporary artists worldwide. Participating in the 14th International Exhibition are:

Christine Battle, England; Phansakdi Chakkaphak, Thailand; Li-Jun Chen, China; Gaynor Dickeson, England; Ria van Elk-van Altena, Netherlands; Dianne Emery, Australia; Mayumi Ezure, Japan; Laura Fantini, United States; Lara Call Gastinger, United States; Ellen Gaube, United States; Janice Glimn-Lacy, United States; Cherie Ann Gossett, United States; Asuka Hishiki, Japan; Annie Hughes, Australia; Carolyn Jenkins, England; Barbara Klaas, United States; Esther Klahne, United States; David Kopitzke, United States; Joo-Young Lee, South Korea; Kyung-Min Lee, South Korea; Charlotte Linder, England; Roberta Mattioli, Italy; Carrie Megan, United States; Kayoko Miyazawa, Japan; Masako Mori, Japan; Julie Nettleton, Australia; Mary Anne O’Malley, United States; Tomoko Otomo, Japan; Beth Phillip, England; Lesley Randall, United States; Abigail Rorer, United States; Susan Rubin, United States; Gael Sellwood, England; Deborah B. Shaw, United States; Janet Snyman, South Africa; Min-Jeung Son, South Korea; Sun Yingbao, China; Charlotte Staub Thomas, United States; Denise Walser-Kolar, United States; Eric Wert, United States; and Margaret Wilson, United States.

A full-color, illustrated catalogue with biographical data, portraits of the artists and reproductions of the artworks will be available for purchase. Collectively, the 14 International catalogues include 1,129 artists and are the most comprehensive record available of contemporary botanical artists and illustrators. Most of the previous International catalogues are available for purchase at the Institute.


Visitor Information

The exhibition will be on display on the 5th floor of the Hunt Library building at Carnegie Mellon University and will be open to the public free of charge.

Hours: Monday–Friday, 9 AM – Noon and 1–5 PM; Sunday, 1–4 PM (except November 24 and November 28 – December 1, 2013). The library will also be open on Saturday September 28, 2013 (1-4 PM) during Carnegie Mellon University’s Céilidh Weekend festivities. Hours subject to change, please call or email before your visit to confirm the library will be open.



About the Hunt Institute

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation.

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Rumex obtusifolius leaf [Rumex obtusifolius Linnaeus, Polygonaceae], watercolor on paper by Julia Trickey, 2006, 55 × 36.5 cm, HI Art accession no. 7755, © 2006 Julia Trickey, All Rights Reserved.

Rumex obtusifolius leaf [Rumex obtusifolius Linnaeus, Polygonaceae], watercolor on paper by Julia Trickey, 2006, 55 × 36.5 cm, HI Art accession no. 7755, © 2006 Julia Trickey, All Rights Reserved.

What We Collect:
Recent Art Acquisitions, 2007-2012

Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation
Carnegie Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA
March 22 – June 30, 2013

A selection of recent acquisitions to the Art Department of the Hunt Institute, from the early 19th century through the present, will be placed in the context of the Institute’s collection practices and the history of botanical illustration. Whether working alongside botanists for scientific and horticultural publications or preparing artworks for collectors, galleries or commercial use, artists throughout the centuries have added their individual perspectives to portraying plants and have made lasting contributions to the botanical record and the history of art.

Included will be original illustrations for an early-19th-century botanical handbook and its contemporary, the field guide; a 19th-century classroom wall chart and the modern text book; a 20th-century seed packet and a booklet on seedling identification; a 20th-century monograph on the mistletoe genus and a journal article on marine fungi; drawings and watercolors illustrated by research botany professors; independent projects on floras of a region, native and medicinal plants and plants and their pollinators; and recent botanical artworks by artists previously represented in Hunt Institute’s International Exhibition of Art & Illustration. Mediums represented are watercolor on paper and vellum; ink, graphite and charcoal drawing; printmaking techniques: copper etching, wood engraving, vitreography and nature printing; and gelatin silver photography.

The artists working before 1900 include Pancrace Bessa (1772–1846), Sydenham Edwards (1769?–1819), Will Kilburn (1745–1818), James Sowerby (1757–1822), William Jackson Hooker (1785–1865), W. A. Meyn (19th-century), Powe (18th-century) and Christian Schkuhr (1741–1811). The contemporary artists featured include Bobbie Angell, Wendy Brockman, John Cody, Felicity Rose Cole, Carolyn Crawford, Paul Dobe (1880–1965), John Doughty, Beverly Duncan, Josephine Elwes Ewes, Alison Gianangeli, Janice Glimn-Lacy, Audrey Hardcastle, Lizzie Harper, Christina Hart-Davies, Lyn Hayden, Richard Homala (1934–2009), Brigette Kohlmeyer, Job Kuijt, Donelda LaBrake, Peter Loewer, Rogers McVaugh (1912–2009), Susan G. Monden, Cindy Nelson-Nold (1957–2009), Susan Ogilvy, Kandis Phillips, Alfred Putz (1892–1966), Mary Rankin, Thomas Reaume, Eugeni Sierra-Ràfols (1919–1999), Eva Stockhaus, Jessica Tcherepnine, Julia Trickey, Denise Walser Kolar, John Wilkinson and Sun Yingbao.

The Hunt’s annual Open House will be held in conjunction with this exhibition. Curators, librarians and staff will lead exhibition tours and discuss the history of botanical wall charts and botanical publications during this event. View the library’s Open House schedule.


Visitor Information

The exhibition will be on display on the 5th floor of the Hunt Library building at Carnegie Mellon University and will be open to the public free of charge.

Hours: Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–Noon and 1–5 p.m.; Sunday, 1–4 p.m. (except March 29-31, May 5 and May 26-27). Hours subject to change, please call or email before your visit to confirm the library will be open.



About the Hunt Institute

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation.

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The Hunt Institute of Botanical Documentation will host its annual open house in June. This year the library will host lectures and tours related to the exhibition What We Collect: Recent Art Acquisitions, 2007-2012.

Here is the schedule of events:


Sunday, June 23, 2013

    1:00
    Registration (continues all afternoon)

    1:15–1:30
    Welcome and Introduction in Reading Room by Publication and Marketing Manager Scarlett Townsend

    1:30–2:15
    Exhibition Tour of What We Collect: Recent Art Acquisitions, 2007–2012 by Curatorial Assistant Carrie Roy

    2:15–3:00
    Walking tour of Reading Room furniture by Publication and Marketing Manager Scarlett Townsend

    3:15–4:00
    Botanical Wall Charts
    Lugene Bruno, Curator of Art
    Bruno will present an overview of the Hunt Institute’s collection of instructional wall charts that were produced in Europe and circulated around the world from the late 19th to the early 20th centuries. Using the less expensive printing process of lithography, these large-scale charts featured the characteristics of important plant families (often in magnified detail) and were used in introductory to advanced botany courses. As information became accessible in different formats, this important record of educational presentation fell into disuse. In recent decades these charts have often been retrieved from neglected storage areas and dumpsters and donated to institutions for preservation.

    4:00–4:30
    Enjoy exhibition and displays; talk with curators and staff


Monday, June 24, 2013

    1:00
    Registration (continues all afternoon)

    1:15–1:30
    Welcome and Introduction in Reading Room by Curator of Art Lugene Bruno

    1:30–2:15
    Exhibition Tour of What We Collect: Recent Art Acquisitions, 2007–2012 by Curatorial Assistant Carrie Roy

    2:15–3:00 W
    Walking tour of Reading Room furniture by Publication and Marketing Manager Scarlett Townsend

    3:15–3:45
    From Field to Folio: Stories Behind Botanical Publications
    Jeannette McDevitt, Assistant Librarian
    Long before our modern conveniences, such as overnight shipments and photocopies, passionate botanists and botanical artists were pouring blood, sweat and tears into their work. Ever at the mercy of the natural elements, each other and tight budgets, they traveled near and far to document the world’s flora. McDevitt will display some of Hunt Institute’s special items and speak about the dramas, disasters and absurdities that went on behind the scenes before these beautiful books could come to fruition.

    3:45–4:30
    Enjoy exhibition and displays; talk with curators and staff



Related

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Cover of Robert Tyas’ The Language of Flowers, or Floral Emblems or Thoughts, Feelings and Sentiments (London, George Routledge and Sons, 1869), HI Library call no. DG21 T977L.

Courtesy of The Hunt Institute

FLORA’S LEXICON
25 March–30 June 2011

Flora’s Lexicon explores the 19th-century European and American phenomenon of The Language of Flowers, the common understanding that plants and blooms were charged with sentiment and meaning and held the potential to express emotion or to communicate privileged messages within the strict confines of social etiquette. Flower associations made their way into Victorian language from various sources, including Japanese, Middle Eastern, Turkish, Greek and Roman cultures, religions and mythology, as well as the literature of Shakespeare and the still-life painting of 17th-century Dutch artists. The result was a fashionable system of floral connotations that blossomed during a time of burgeoning public interest in botany and its scientific importance.

So pervasive and popular was The Language of Flowers trend that it launched the introduction of the floral dictionary or Language of Flowers book, a small, beautifully bound and illustrated volume devoted to the decoding of each flower’s secret meaning. This sentimental craze and the books associated with it originated in France, the most notable being Le Langage des Fleures of 1819 by Charlotte de Latour. This volume was reprinted in multiple editions, translated into English and imitated by other French, British and American authors until the trend waned in the mid-1880s, shortly after English author and illustrator Kate Greenaway (1846–1901) published her charmingly illustrated floral dictionary, The Language of Flowers (1884).

The Language of Flowers book phenomenon also attracted the skills of numerous

To beauty, friendship and love (rose, ivy and myrtle), hand-colored engraving published by Saunders and Otley, Conduit Street, from Anna Christian Burke’s The Illustrated Language of Flowers (London, G. Routledge and Co., 1856), HI Library call no. DG21 B959I.

respected botanical artists of the era, including Pierre-Joseph Redouté (1759–1840), Pancrace Bessa (1772–1846), Pierre-Jean-François Turpin (1775–1840) and Pierre-Antoine Poiteau (1766–1854). Although their illustrations for this genre differed slightly in scale and scientific detail from their major works, they were prized for their beauty and added to the appeal of these intricately bound and decorated volumes while serving to familiarize a large segment of the population with the artists’ talent.

Flora’s Lexicon presents books from the Hunt Institute’s Library and botanical portraits from the Art Department in an examination of the scope of The Language of Flowers phenomenon, from the influences on its beginning to its continued presence in 21st-century publishing. Differing approaches to the floral dictionary are displayed, while intricate systems of meaning are explored through artworks of many key 18th- and 19th-century botanical artists and illustrators.


Location & Hours

The exhibition will be on display on the 5th floor of the Hunt Library building at Carnegie Mellon University and will be open to the public free of charge. Hours: Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–noon and 1–5 p.m.; Sunday, 1–4 p.m. (except 22–24 April; 15 and 29–30 May). Hours subject to change, please call or email before your visit to confirm viewing hours. For further information, contact the Hunt Institute at 412-268-2434.


Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

5th Floor, Hunt Library
Carnegie Mellon University
4909 Frew Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890
Telephone: 412-268-2434
Email: huntinst@andrew.cmu.edu
Website: http://huntbot.andrew.cmu.edu
Directions: View map

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