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By Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation presents
Exquisite Patterns in Nature from March 19 – June 30, 2017. This exhibition includes selections of artwork and books from the Hunt Institute’s permanent collections that are representative of, or inspired by, the fascinating configurations in the architecture of all organisms.

The patterns on display include simple symmetries and more complex tessellations and fractals; growth rings, whorls and logarithmic spirals; explorations of larger patterns observed through groupings of like plants and plant parts; the visual study of plants in complex decorative arrangements and examples of these patterns in practice.

    Opening reception
    Join us Sunday, March 19, 2017, 2-4 p.m. for the reception. At 2:30 p.m. the curators will give a short introduction to the exhibition in the gallery.

    Open House 2017
    Our annual Open House on Sunday, June 25 (1:45-4:30 p.m.) will include a talk (2:00-3:00 p.m.) and an exhibition tour (3:15-4:00 p.m.). Librarian Charlotte Tancin will present A celebration of plants, enjoying endless variety of form and kind, a talk and display from the Institute’s rare book collection. Striking historical illustrations of selected kinds of plants or aspects of their forms will be on display. She will talk briefly about each image, discussing what can be seen in the image and how the published image would have supported the work of botanists at the time, such as in floristic studies, reports of explorations, monographs on a family or genus, documenting new introductions or celebrating exotic garden plants. This event is free and open to the public.

[Insect- and wind-borne pollen of Dicotyledoneae and Monocotyledoneae], watercolor on paper by Anne Ophelia Todd Dowden (1907–2007), ca.1990, 25 × 17.5 cm, for her The Clover and the Bee: A Book of Pollination (New York, Thomas Crowell, 1990, p. 12), HI Art accession no. 7408.39, Rights, except gift industry, held by Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation.

[Insect- and wind-borne pollen of Dicotyledoneae and Monocotyledoneae], watercolor on paper by Anne Ophelia Todd Dowden (1907–2007), ca.1990, 25 × 17.5 cm, for her The Clover and the Bee: A Book of Pollination (New York, Thomas Crowell, 1990, p. 12), HI Art accession no. 7408.39, Rights, except gift industry, held by Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation.


About the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation. To this end, the Institute acquires and maintains authoritative collections of books, plant images, manuscripts, portraits and data files, and provides publications and other modes of information service. The Institute meets the reference needs of botanists, biologists, historians, conservationists, librarians, bibliographers and the public at large, especially those concerned with any aspect of the North American flora.

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Gael Louise Sellwood (England) ‘Altona’ (in early autumn), Hydrangea macrophylla [Hydrangea macrophylla (Thunberg) Seringe, Hydrangeaceae], 2011, watercolor on paper

© 2011 Gael Louise Sellwood (England)
‘Altona’ (in early autumn), Hydrangea macrophylla [Hydrangea
macrophylla
(Thunberg) Seringe, Hydrangeaceae], watercolor on paper.
All rights reserved

The Petaluma Arts Center invites you to Floribunda!

Floribunda is a celebration of all things floral and will feature the 14th International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration, a traveling exhibition by The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation. This exhibition has traveled around the country for two years and the Petaluma Arts Center will be its last stop.

In addition to featuring the 36 artists from nine countries in The Hunt exhibition, the Petaluma Arts Center will also celebrate the work of Aimee Baldwin, Evan Kolker and Randy Strong — three Bay Area artists who create three-dimensional representations of flowers.

“This exhibition is designed as a source of inspiration and an invitation to see the natural world around us in distinct ways, to illuminate the relationship between art and science,” says Exhibitions Manager Kim Chigi. “With Botany as one of the sciences, we are excited about the juxtaposition of traditional botanical illustration with the contemporary three-dimensional creations, working in tandem, to explore the connections between the creativity of both artist and nature.”

The Petaluma Arts Center will host a series of events related to the exhibition. They include an artists’ talk, studio workshops, and botanical art demonstrations featuring Sonoma county artists. Here is the schedule of events:

  • Saturday, October 22: Opening Reception, 5:00-7:00 pm
  • Saturday, November 5: Botanical Art Demonstrations with Nina Antze, Martha Kemp, Lucy Martin and Vi Strain, 1:00 pm
  • Thursday, November 10: Artists’ Talk with Evan Kolker and Randy Strong, 7:00 pm; doors open at 6:30 pm.
  • Sunday, November 12 -13: Watercolor Botanical Workshop with Amber Turner

Details and ticket information can be found on the Petaluma Arts Center’s website, on the Events page.

Floribunda opens to the public on Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016 at 11:00 am. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, Oct. 22 from 5:00-7:00 pm.

To arrange for group visits or school tours, email exhibitions@PetalumaArtsCenter.org or call Kim at (707) 762-5600 x104.



About Petaluma Arts Center

Housed in the historic Railroad Station freight building, next to the Petaluma Visitors Center, Petaluma Arts Center (PAC) hosts art exhibitions, performances, art classes, literary and film lectures, and events. The Arts Center grew out of the grassroots Petaluma Arts Council, founded in 1998 with a goal of acknowledging and celebrating local artists and their contributions. Located next to the upcoming SMART commuter train station in developing Midtown Petaluma, the arts center is experiencing a renaissance along with the growth of the arts in Sonoma County.

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By The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

Soft Tree Fern, Dicksonia antarctica [Dicksonia antarctica Labillardière, Dicksoniaceae], watercolor on paper by Laurie Andrews (1936–), 2008, 76.5 ◊ 56.5 cm, HI Art accession no. 8078, reproduced by permission of the artist.

Soft Tree Fern, Dicksonia antarctica [Dicksonia antarctica Labillardière, Dicksoniaceae], watercolor on paper by Laurie Andrews (1936–), 2008, 76.5 ◊ 56.5 cm, HI Art accession no. 8078, reproduced by permission of the artist.

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation presents our
15th International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration from
15 September to 15 December 2016. This exhibition includes 43 artworks by 43 artists who are citizens of 15 countries. The Institute established the International series in 1964 with the hope of supporting and encouraging contemporary botanical artists. Every three years, the International series features the works of talented botanical artists from around the world.

Join us Thursday, 13 October 2016 from 6-8 p.m. for the reception. At 6:30 p.m. the curators will give a short introduction to the exhibition in the gallery.

A full-color, illustrated catalog with biographical data, portraits of the artists and reproductions of the artworks accompanies the exhibition. Collectively, the 15 International series catalogs include 1,172 artists and are the most comprehensive record available of contemporary botanical artists and illustrators to date.


View list of participating artists and selected artworks

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Donguri [Acorn, Quercus Linnaeus, Fagaceae], acrylic, gouache and pencil on paper by Kieta Yonezu (1943–), 1982, 30 × 46 cm, for Rureberukan, Donguri (Chiyodaku, Tokyo, Kanda Ogawamachi, 1983), HI Art accession no. 6838.

Donguri [Acorn, Quercus Linnaeus, Fagaceae], acrylic, gouache and pencil on paper by Kieta Yonezu (1943–), 1982, 30 × 46 cm, for Rureberukan, Donguri (Chiyodaku, Tokyo, Kanda Ogawamachi, 1983), HI Art accession no. 6838.


Great Expectations

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation
March 17 – June 30, 2016


By The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation presents “Great Expectations” from 17 March to 30 June 2016. There is great expectation in the promise and energy held within a bud or a seed, and phases of this continuous cycle of plant development are beautifully illustrated with collection items.

Join us Thursday, 17 March 2016, 5-7 p.m. for an opening reception. At 5:30 p.m. the curators will give a short introduction to the exhibition in the gallery.

Our annual Open House on Sunday, 26 June (1:00-4:30 p.m.) will include the talk “Forward into the past: The past, present and future of Carrie Furnaces” (1:30-2:30 p.m.) by Ronald A. Baraff, director of Historic Resources and Facilities, Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area, in which he will discuss how the arts, nature, preservation and aesthetics interplay with the historic at the Carrie Furnaces. Following the talk will be tours of the “Great Expectations” exhibition and the reading room (2:30-4:00 p.m.). This event is free and open to the public.

A tour of the landscape around the Carrie Furnaces in Rankin, PA, will be held on Saturday, 21 May, 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Please contact Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area (412-464-4020; info@riversofsteel.com) for more information and to purchase a ticket ($15).


Hours

“Great Expectations” will be on display on the 5th floor of the Hunt Library building at Carnegie Mellon University and will be open to the public free of charge. Hours: Monday–Friday, 9 AM–noon and 1–5 PM; Sunday, 1–4 PM (except 25–27 March, 1 May and 29–30 May). Hours subject to change, please call or email before your visit to confirm. For further information, contact the Hunt Institute at 412-268-2434.


Related
:

Cabinet of curiosities

On display from 19 January to 30 June 2016 in the Cabinet of curiosities in the Hunt Institute lobby is a two-leaf fragment of a handwritten copy of the Macer Floridus estimated to be from the mid-12th century, as well as several early printed editions. Visit during normal business hours (Monday–Friday, 9 AM–noon and 1–5 PM) to see this fragment from our Archives, which is the oldest item in our collections, and the printed edition from 1477, which is the oldest printed book in our Library.



About the Institute

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation. To this end, the Institute acquires and maintains authoritative collections of books, plant images, manuscripts, portraits and data files, and provides publications and other modes of information service. The Institute meets the reference needs of botanists, biologists, historians, conservationists, librarians, bibliographers and the public at large, especially those concerned with any aspect of the North American flora.

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Clockwise from above left: Assemblage, watercolor and pencil on Kelmscott vellum by Kate Nessler, 2014, 30.5 × 22", © 2014 Kate Nessler, All rights reserved; Bird Nest Series No.1, colored pencil on paper by David Morrison, 2014, 13 × 19", © 2014 David Morrison, All rights reserved; Woven Trees, archival ink-jet print from 2.25 film negative by Sue Abramson, 2014, 24 × 24", © 2014 Sue Abramson, All rights reserved; Epilogue, watercolor on Cowley’s veiny calfskin vellum by Wendy Brockman, 2014, 27 × 23", © 2014 Wendy Brockman, All rights reserved.

Clockwise from above left: Assemblage, watercolor and pencil on Kelmscott vellum by Kate Nessler, 2014, 30.5 × 22″, © 2014 Kate Nessler, All rights reserved; Bird Nest Series No.1, colored pencil on paper by David Morrison, 2014, 13 × 19″, © 2014 David Morrison, All rights reserved; Woven Trees, archival ink-jet print from 2.25 film negative by Sue Abramson, 2014, 24 × 24″, © 2014 Sue Abramson, All rights reserved; Epilogue, watercolor on Cowley’s veiny calfskin vellum by Wendy Brockman, 2014, 27 × 23″, © 2014 Wendy Brockman, All rights reserved.

Elements
Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation
Pittsburgh, PA
March 19 – June 30, 2015

The Hunt Instutute invites you to view Elements!

The exhibition Elements features drawings and watercolors of bird nests with a focus on the natural and man-made materials incorporated into these architectural structures. Photographs of forest understory will transport the viewer between the landscape and the ephemeral artifacts that signify the remains of a cycle of building, incubating, nesting and fledging. The featured artists are Sue Abramson, Wendy Brockman, David Morrison and Kate Nessler. The creators of these drawings and watercolors of bird nests and photographs of transitional landscapes are inspired by the relationship of the nest to time, place, music and architecture. Each artist has imbued the structures and the materials used and the locations and environments where built with their individual insight and perspective. Also included in the exhibition is a selection of birds, nests and eggs on loan from the Carnegie Museum of Natural History.

Pittsburgh artist Sue Abramson’s photographs of the Frick Park woodlands are a response to the raw materials in nests and the extraordinary visual chaos of these habitats. Minnesota artist Wendy Brockman’s watercolors of nests, eggs, feathers and plant materials are rich with nuance and complexity and speak of time and place. Indiana artist David Morrison’s colored pencil drawings are an exploration of the issues of existence, regeneration and obsessiveness through his examination of the layers of natural and found objects that compose the architectural structures of nests. Arkansas artist Kate Nessler’s watercolors are expressive of symphonic movements, and they reflect the intrinsically creative and practical use of disparate materials that are woven to create a space of strength and balance that are essential for survival.


Opening reception

The opening reception on 19 March (5–7 pm) is open to the public. Beginning at 5:30 pm each of the four artists will introduce their work in the Elements exhibition. This is an opportunity to meet all the artists.


Talk one-on-one with the artists

On Friday, 20 March, 10 am–noon and 1–4 pm, visit the gallery at any time during the designated hours and talk one-on-one with three of the artists. Abramson, Brockman and Nessler will be available to discuss their concepts and process and will display their materials, and Brockman also will demonstrate her painting technique. This event is free and open to the public.


Open House 2015

Our annual Open House on Sunday, 28 June (1:00–4:30 pm) will include the talk “Nest structures of North American birds and the materials used in their creation” (1:30–2:30 pm) by Patrick McShea, program officer and educator, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, and tours of the Elements exhibition and the reading room (2:30–4:00 pm). This event is free and open to the public.


Cabinet of curiosities

The Cabinet of curiosities in the Hunt Institute lobby will display bird illustrations from the Library’s rich collection of natural history and art books, including Mark Catesby’s (1683–1749) exquisite folio, The Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands (London, the author, 1731), and works by microscopist Marcello Malpighi (1628–1694), natural historian the Comte de Buffon (1707–1788) and the artist George Brookshaw (1751–1823).


Hours

The exhibition will be on display on the 5th floor of the Hunt Library building at Carnegie Mellon University and will be open to the public free of charge. Hours: Monday–Friday, 9 am–noon and 1–5 pm; Sunday, 1–4 pm (except 3–5 April, 3 May and 24–25 May). Because our hours of operation are occasionally subject to change, please call or email before your visit to confirm. For further information, contact the Hunt Institute at 412-268-2434.



About the Institute

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation. To this end, the Institute acquires and maintains authoritative collections of books, plant images, manuscripts, portraits and data files, and provides publications and other modes of information service. The Institute meets the reference needs of botanists, biologists, historians, conservationists, librarians, bibliographers and the public at large, especially those concerned with any aspect of the North American flora.

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By The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation invites you to view
Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines and Prickles from September 18 to December 18, 2014. This exhibition includes artworks and books that depict the formidable and yet beautiful defensive structures of thorns, spines and prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Featured are drawings, watercolors, prints and books displaying thistles, teasels, cacti, roses, berry brambles, stinging nettles and citrus trees.

The first step in appreciating these defensive structures is an understanding of what they are and how they differ from each other. In the most basic sense, thorns, spines and prickles can all refer to the sharp, stiff, woody defensive appendages found on some plants. Thorns are modified stems, as in Citrus Linnaeus. Spines are modified leaves, as in Echinocactus Link & Otto. Prickles differ in that they emerge from the epidermis, mesophyll or cortex of the plant, as in Rosa Linnaeus. Examples of these structures will be depicted in a variety of ways, from detailed scientific illustrations to loose interpretations, but all showing how beautiful these structures can be.

Left, Citron: Citrus medica [Citrus medica Linnaeus, Rutaceae], watercolor on paper by Marilena Pistoia (Italy), [pre-1984], 35 × 25.5 cm, for Laura Peroni, Il Linguaggio del Fiori (Milan, Arnoldo Mondadori, 1984, p. 53), HI Art accession no. 6773.20, © 1984 Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, Milan, All rights reserved. Center, Teasel [Dipsacus Linnaeus, Dipsacaceae], watercolor on paper by Celia Crampton (Africa/England), 2003, 37 × 28 cm, HI Art accession no. 7586, © 2003 Celia Crampton, All rights reserved. Right, Rosa canina L. [Rosa Linnaeus, Rosaceae], watercolor on paper by Petr Liska (Czech Republic), 1981, 24 × 16.5 cm, HI Art accession no. 6463, © 1981 Petr Liska, All rights reserved.

Left, Citron: Citrus medica [Citrus medica Linnaeus, Rutaceae], watercolor on paper by Marilena Pistoia (Italy), [pre-1984], 35 × 25.5 cm, for Laura Peroni, Il Linguaggio del Fiori (Milan, Arnoldo Mondadori, 1984, p. 53), HI Art accession no. 6773.20, © 1984 Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, Milan, All rights reserved.
Center, Teasel [Dipsacus Linnaeus, Dipsacaceae], watercolor on paper by Celia Crampton (Africa/England), 2003, 37 × 28 cm, HI Art accession no. 7586,
© 2003 Celia Crampton, All rights reserved.
Right, Rosa canina L. [Rosa Linnaeus, Rosaceae], watercolor on paper by Petr Liska (Czech Republic), 1981, 24 × 16.5 cm, HI Art accession no. 6463, © 1981 Petr Liska, All rights reserved.

Artists represented are Marie Angel (England, 1923–2010); Diana Carmichael (United Kingdom/South Africa, 1926–2010); Louis Claude de Chastillon (France, 1639–1734); Celia Crampton (Africa/England); Anne Ophelia Todd Dowden (United States, 1907–2007); Raymond Dowden (United States, 1905–1982); Georg Dionys Ehret (Germany/England, 1708–1770); Henry Evans (United States, 1918–1990); Alejandro Gavriloff (Estonia/Argentina, 1914–1993); Lucretia Hamilton (United States, 1908–1986); Charlotte Hannan (Germany/United States); Jeanne Russell Janish (also Mrs. Carl F. Janish; United States, 1902–1998); Christabel King (England); Carl Ignaz Leopold Kny (Germany, 1841–1916); Paul Landacre (United States, 1893–1963); Dorika Leyniers de Buyst (Belgium); Chrissie Lightfoot (England); Petr Liska (Czechoslovakia); Stanley Maltzman (United States); Yoshikaru Matsumura (Japan, 1906–1967); Roderick McEwen (Scotland, 1932–1982); Joan McGann (United States); Jeni Neale (also Jeni Barlow; England); Gunnar Normann (Sweden, 1912–2005); Marilena Pistoia (Italy); Frantisek Procházka (Czechoslovakia, 1911–1976); Pierre-Joseph Redouté (Belgium, 1759–1840); Elizabeth Rice (England); Nicolas Robert (France, 1614–1685); Christian Schkuhr (Germany, 1741–1811); Geraldine King Tam (United States); Gesina B. Threlkeld (Netherlands/United States); Unknown artist (Mexico, fl.1787–1803), Torner Collection of Sessé & Mociño Biological Illustrations; Unknown artist (United States, fl.1900s), USDA Forest Service Collection; Frederick Andrews Walpole (United States, 1861–1904). A selection of rare books from the Hunt Institute Library collection also is included in this exhibition.

Join us Thursday, September 18, 2014 from 5–7 PM for an opening reception. At 5:30 PM Assistant Curator of Art Carrie Roy will give a short introduction to the exhibition in the gallery. We will also open on Saturday, October 11, 1–4 pm, during Carnegie Mellon University’s Cèilidh Weekend festivities. Docent–led tours will be available throughout the afternoon.



Related

Cabinet of Curiosities
During Fall 2014, The Hunt’s Cabinet of Curiosities will highlight books from the Library’s collection featuring plants with thorns, spines and prickles. Humans are often undeterred by these sometimes pain-inducing plant features, finding that their sharpness can serve a purpose or that the plant is useful despite the pricks and jabs one might incur. Visit the Cabinet in the library’s lobby to explore how these plants have been utilized.

The exhibition will be on display on the 5th floor of the Hunt Library building at Carnegie Mellon University and will be open to the public free of charge.
Hours: Monday–Friday, 9 AM to Noon and 1–5 PM; Sunday, 1–4 PM (except November 23 and November 27-30). Because hours are subject to change, please call or email before your visit to confirm. For further information, contact the Hunt Institute at 412-268-2434.


About the Institute

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation. The Institute meets the reference needs of botanists, biologists, historians, conservationists, librarians, bibliographers and the public at large, especially those concerned with any aspect of the North American flora.

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By Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

As part of a multi-year photography initiative at the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, we are working to photograph our entire Art collection. These photos are primarily for in-house purposes, but we would like to add small, 100 dpi thumbnails of the artwork to our Catalogue of the Botanical Art Collection at the Hunt Institute database, which is accessible on our Web site. These thumbnails will be of low-resolution, unable to be reproduced and still protected by copyright where applicable. Adding thumbnails of the 29,470 works in our Art collection to our online database not only will provide helpful information for researchers but also will give potential visitors and scholars the opportunity to see amazing examples of botanical art by historical masters and leading contemporary artists. To date we have photographed and added thumbnails for several collections that are out of copyright or are otherwise in the public domain.

Because this is a use not covered in the original donation or purchase agreement prior to 2010, we would like to contact all living artists (or their heirs) who have work in our collection to request permission to include thumbnail images in our database. We ask that any artist who has participated in our International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration series prior to the 13th International in 2010 and whose work is in our collection please contact:

    Carrie Roy
    Assistant Curator of Art
    Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation
    5th Floor, Hunt Library
    4909 Frew Street
    Carnegie Mellon University
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    Telephone: 412-268-3035
    Fax: 412-268-5677
    Contact Carrie Roy

State either “Yes, I grant permission for a thumbnail of my artwork to be included on the Web site” or “No, I do not wish for my artwork to have a thumbnail on the Web site.” Be sure to include updated contact information so that we can include it in our private records and contact you should there be any request involving your work.

Feel free to contact us with any questions you have about this issue, and please note that this is a multi-year project involving both a Web site re-design and extensive photography. Photos will be uploaded to the Web site in stages, and we cannot give an exact date for when any single artwork will appear.


About the Institute

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation. To this end, the Institute acquires and maintains authoritative collections of books, plant images, manuscripts, portraits and data files, and provides publications and other modes of information service. The Institute meets the reference needs of botanists, biologists, historians, conservationists, librarians, bibliographers and the public at large, especially those concerned with any aspect of the North American flora.

Hunt Institute was dedicated in 1961 as the Rachel McMasters Miller Hunt Botanical Library, an international center for bibliographical research and service in the interests of botany and horticulture, as well as a center for the study of all aspects of the history of the plant sciences. By 1971 the Library’s activities had so diversified that the name was changed to Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation. Growth in collections and research projects led to the establishment of four programmatic departments: Archives, Art, Bibliography and the Library. The current collections include approximately 30,150 book and serial titles; 29,000+ portraits; 29,470 watercolors, drawings and prints; 243,000+ data files; and 2,000 autograph letters and manuscripts. The Archives specializes in biographical information about, portraits of and handwriting samples from scientists, illustrators and all others in the plant sciences. The Archives is a repository of alternate resort and as such has collected over 300 institutional and individual archival collections that may not have otherwise found an easy fit at another institution. Including artworks dating from the Renaissance, the Art Department’s collection now focuses on contemporary botanical art and illustration, where the coverage is unmatched. The Art Department organizes and stages exhibitions, including the triennial International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration. The Bibliography Department maintains comprehensive data files on the history and bibliography of botanical literature. Known for its collection of historical works on botany dating from the late 1400s to the present, the Library’s collection focuses on the development of botany as a science and also includes herbals (eight are incunabula), gardening manuals and florilegia, many of them pre-Linnaean. Modern taxonomic monographs, floristic works and serials as well as selected works in medical botany, economic botany, landscape architecture and a number of other plant-related topics are also represented.

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