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By Wohlfarth Galleries

Opuntia polyacantha (Prickly Pear) © 2001 Donald Davidson, all rights reserved

Botanical Field Illustrations in Watercolor II
Donald Davidson
Wohlfarth Galleries
Washington, DC
March 10 – April 6, 2018

Botanical illustrator Donald Davidson will launch a second solo show of dramatic watercolors of native botanicals at Wohlfarth Galleries in Washington, DC. This exhibition opens March 10 and continues through April 6, 2018. Last year’s show nearly sold out and focused on works from deserts and Vieques, Puerto Rico, as will this year’s show.

Viewers will find a return to the spare, unvarnished approach that seemingly belies Davidson’s devotion to neo-expressionism back in the 1980’s. In his depiction of the Puerto Rican native plant, Talinum fruticosum, an edible succulent related to portulaca found in many DC-area gardens, the artist captures this plant’s rooted, yet lively dance of nature with direct brush and pen strokes that reveal the anatomical elements key to its botanical identification.

Davidson received his first solo museum show as a painter of native flora from the Centennial Museum of El Paso in 2004. This exhibition became a traveling show displayed at visitor centers within the National Parks system. His work was on view in 2016 in the exhibition, Flora of the National Parks, at the US Botanical Garden on the Smithsonian Mall.

Awarded the Presidential Gold Medal for Volunteer Service, Davidson has created over 600 watercolors spanning 20 years, as an artist-in-the-park, under the auspices of the US Department of Interior in support of its mandate to monitor and preserve native species on public lands nationwide. Ten percent of sales will be donated to Friends Group of the Vieques National Wildlife Refuge to help with Hurricane Maria recovery.

Meet Donald and ask questions about his work during the opening reception scheduled for Saturday, March 10, 2018, from 3-5pm. Wohlfarth Galleries is located in the Brookland Arts’ District, one block from Red Line Metro (map). Gallery hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 11 AM – 4 PM and by appointment.


Visit Wohlfarth Galleries

Kick-off the spring season with this class by Botanical Dimensions:

© Donna Torres, Brugmansia sanguinea

Botanical Illustration
The Art of Seeing, Drawing and Painting Plants

A 2-day workshop with artists Donna Torres and Kathleen Harrison
Occidental Center for the Arts
Botanical Dimensions
Occidental, CA
March 3-4, 2018
10 AM – 4 PM

This 2-day weekend workshop will focus on the accurate representation of plants in graphite and watercolor. Kathleen Harrison will lead the first day of drawing. We will introduce how to see the form of a plant, review tools and materials, and will each make a graphite drawing of a plant. Donna Torres will teach the second day, teaching specific watercolor techniques used in botanical art, color theory and special techniques to bring life into your plant illustration. You may register for the entire weekend, or choose one of the days, as space allows.

View additional information and registration options on the class website.



About Botanical Dimensions

Founded in 1985 by Kathleen Harrison and Terence McKenna, Botanical Dimensions collects and protects plants of ethnographic-medical significance and their lore, educates people about plants and mushrooms, and preserves ecosystems and traditions of ecological knowledge. Learn more at www.botanicaldimensions.org

Ann S. Hoffenberg, Paperbark Maple (2017), Acer griseum, Rutgers Gardens, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Watercolor on paper, 9 x 13 inches. © Ann S. Hoffenberg. Courtesy of the American Society of Botanical Artists and the New York Botanical Garden.



Save the date!

The third triennial exhibition by the New York Botanical Garden and the American Society of Botanical Artists is coming to Southern California.

Out of the Woods: Celebrating Trees in Public Gardens, will be at
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens from May 19 through August 27, 2018. This exhibition will be on view in the Flora-Legium Gallery at the Brody Botanical Center.

This juried exhibition includes 43 artworks in watercolor, oil, graphite, colored pencil, and ink, depicting everything from seedpods to bark to an entire forest floor.

“Out of the Woods” highlights the role public gardens and arboreta play in engaging visitors with trees and their ecological and utilitarian roles. It also underscores the conservation, research, and scholarship occurring at these public institutions.
 
“By bringing these subjects to life through their work, this extraordinary group of botanical artists creates new pathways for communicating the beauty and value of plants to contemporary life,” said James Folsom, the Telleen/Jorgensen Director of the Botanical Gardens at The Huntington. “I can’t think of a more critical time than now to be hosting this show and talking about this topic.”

A catalog will accompany the exhibition. It will be available for purchase at the Huntington Store.

Drop-in family activities about botanical art will be offered in the Brody Botanical Center every Saturday and Sunday throughout the exhibition. Family activities will be led by members of the Botanical Artists’ Guild of Southern California (BAGSC) from noon to 4 p.m.

Also on view in the Brody Botanical Center will be Amazing Trees, a BAGSC adjunct exhibition featuring the work of local contemporary botanical artists.


About The Huntington

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution serving scholars and the general public. It is located at 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino, CA (map).



Related

This exhibition will travel to St. Charles, MO then Tucson, AZ and then to Chaska, MN after its stop at The Huntington. Learn more at Exhibitions to Visit.

The New York Academy of Medicine Library kicks off the third annual “Color Our Collections” festival. One hundred forty-nine institutions are participating in this year’s festival occurring online now through Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Libraries, archives and cultural institutions around the world have created coloring pages based on images from their collections.

To view the list of participating organizations and to download coloring pages, go to the Color Our Collections website.

If you post your coloring pages online, be sure to use the hashtag #ColorOurCollections.

By The Philadelphia Society of Botanical Illustrators


The Philadelphia Society of Botanical Illustrators (PSBI) is presenting a unique fine art exhibit at the 2018 Philadelphia International Flower Show, March 3-11. This exhibit includes a gallery of botanical art and artists’ demonstrations. Botanical art combines science and artistic interpretation to create pleasing, accurate depictions of plants and flowers.

The theme this year is Wet Feet: Plants That Live in a Watery World. Plants that have “wet feet” live in or along places like bogs, lakes, rivers, streams, estuaries, swamps and marshes around the world. Look for the artist’s signage with their artwork that identifies the plant and its habitat, and why the artist chose it.

The PSBI artists have been demonstrating the techniques of botanical art at the Philadelphia Flower Show since 1998, one year after PSBI was formed. Their demonstrations are part of the PSBI mission to educate the public on the intricacies of botanical art. It is an art form that is a tradition particularly in the Philadelphia area: in the 18th Century John and William Bartram founded and illustrated North America’s first botanical garden.

The PSBI is the local non-profit professional organization for botanical art. It sponsors art classes for youth, and its members teach botanical art in multiple venues.

For more information, visit the PSBI website or contact Amy Stewart.

© Pamela Burgess, all rights reserved
Mountain Aloe (Aloe marlothii), B&W photograph with digital color added, limited edition, museum-quality pigment print, 10 x 7.5 inches

the naturalist’s desk:
language + landscape

Los Angeles County Arboretum
& Botanic Garden
Arcadia, CA
January 27 – June 23, 2018

Pamela Burgess explores the concept and meaning of landscape through art and text in the naturalist’s desk: language + landscape, a one-person exhibition opening next weekend at the Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanic Garden.

Installed throughout the Arboretum Library, the show features work in various media including drawings and poetry, sculpture and photography, selections from the Library’s collection of botanical books, and artwork based on specimens found in the Garden. Together, the library and the exhibition are presented as an oversized cabinet of curiosities adorned with books, drawings, and strange unidentified roots. A map and self-guided tour of the installation will be available for visitors.

Arboretum guests are encouraged to make repeat visits to this exhibition as additional works will be added throughout its six-month run. Meet Pamela and explore the recently renovated Arboretum Library during the opening reception on Saturday, January 27 (2:00-4:30 p.m). An Artist’s Talk will begin at 3:00 p.m.

The Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanic Garden is located at 301 North Baldwin Avenue, Arcadia, CA 91007 (map).


About Pamela Burgess

Pamela Burgess is a contemporary Los Angeles artist whose work is motivated by a fascination with nature and its materials, and a reverence for craftsmanship.

Awards include a Durfee Foundation ARC grant and first Artist-in-Residence of Theodore Payne Foundation. Exhibitions include the Sturt Haaga Gallery at Descanso Gardens, Occidental College, Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden, Avenue 50 Studio, and Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden.

Community environmental work includes board member of the Citizens Committee to Save Elysian Park (from 1997), board member of the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers and Native Plants and chair of its Arts Council (2010-2016), member of the 2007 City of Los Angeles Elysian Park Master Plan Oversight Committee.

No. 11, Rhubarb, Ruibarbo blanco, Cedros [Jatropha podagrica Hooker, Euphorbiaceae], watercolor on paper by Charles Dorat (?1806–ca.1870), 30 × 23.5 cm, HI Art accession no. 5683.11.

Dr. Charles Dorat and His Unrealized Central American Medicinal Flora
Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation
Pittsburgh, PA
April 2 – June 29, 2018

Charles Dorat (?1806-ca.1870) was a European physician and naturalist who lived in El Salvador and traveled in Honduras between 1850 and 1870. Acquainted with Central American medical professionals, government officials and companies interested in material medica, it is thought Dorat was hired by companies because of his knowledge of mining and economic plants.

While in Central America, Dorat pursued interests in nature and art, and by 1860 had painted 150 watercolors of useful plants. These paintings were supposed to be published as a flora of Central America, but Dorat appears to have died around 1870.

Learn more about Dr. Charles Dorat at Dr. Charles Dorat and His Unrealized Central American Medicinal Flora.



About The Hunt Institute

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation. To this end, the Institute acquires and maintains authoritative collections of books, plant images, manuscripts, portraits and data files, and provides publications and other modes of information service. The Institute meets the reference needs of botanists, biologists, historians, conservationists, librarians, bibliographers and the public at large, especially those concerned with any aspect of the North American flora.

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