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From The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

Antonio García Cubas (1832–1912), agricultural map in Atlas pintoresco é historico de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos, (Picturesque and historical atlas of the United States of Mexico), Mexico City: Debray Sucesores, 1885, chromolithograph, 24 13/16 × 30 11/16 in. The Newberry Library, Chicago, Ayer 655.59.G2. Copyright © The Huntington


Visual Voyages:
Images of Latin American Nature from Columbus to Darwin

Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
MaryLou and George Boone Gallery
San Marino, CA
September 16, 2017 – January 8, 2018


Visual Voyages
looks at how indigenous peoples, Europeans, Spanish Americans, and individuals of mixed-race descent depicted natural phenomena for a range of purposes and from a variety of perspectives: artistic, cultural, religious, commercial, medical, and scientific. The exhibition examines the period that falls roughly between Christopher Columbus’s first voyage in 1492 and Charles Darwin’s publication of On the Origin of Species in 1859, a work based largely on Darwin’s own voyage to the region in the 1830s.

“Information and materials circulated at an unprecedented rate as people transformed their relationship to the natural world and to each other,” said Daniela Bleichmar, associate professor of art history and history at the University of Southern California (USC) and co-curator of the exhibition. “Images served not only as artistic objects of great beauty but also as a means of experiencing, understanding and possessing the natural world. These depictions circulated widely and allowed viewers—then and now—to embark on their own ‘visual voyages’.”

Bleichmar, who was born in Argentina and raised in Mexico, is an expert on the history of science, art, and cultural contact in the early modern period. Her publications include the prize-winning book Visible Empire: Botanical Expeditions and Visual Culture in the Hispanic Enlightenment (University of Chicago Press, 2012).

An exhibition catalog will be available beginning September 2017. Published by Yale University Press in association with The Huntington, the 240-page book contains 153 color illustrations ($50.00).

Visual Voyages is an international loan exhibition that is part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative, an exploration of Latin American and Latino art involving more than 70 arts institutions across southern California. Gallery text will be in Spanish and English.


About The Huntington

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution serving scholars and the general public. More information about The Huntington can be found online at huntington.org.


Several programs and exhibitions will be occur in conjunction with this exhibition. Artists, naturalists, and educators may be especially interest in:

    Visual Voyages in the Gardens
    Sept 16, 2017–Jan 8, 2018
    Throughout the Botanical Gardens
    Visitors can enrich their experience of “Visual Voyages” by strolling the botanical gardens in search of the real-life specimens of plants they have seen depicted in the gallery. Keep your eyes peeled for two dozen “Visual Voyages” signs, pointing to cacao, pineapple, tobacco, and other plants indigenous to Latin America.


    In Pursuit of Flora: 18th-Century: Botanical Drawings from The Huntington’s Art Collections

    Oct. 28, 2017 – Feb. 19, 2018
    Huntington Art Gallery, Works on Paper Room
    European exploration of other lands during the so-called Age of Discovery revealed a vast new world of plant life that required description, cataloging, and recording. By the 18th century, the practice of botanical illustration had become an essential tool in the study of natural history. From lusciously detailed drawings of fruit and flowers by Georg Dionysius Ehret (1708–1770), a collaborator of Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus, to depictions of more exotic examples by Matilda Conyers (1753–1803), “In Pursuit of Flora” reveals 18th-century European appreciation for the beauty of the natural world.


    Free Talk and Book Signing

    The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World
    Oct. 15 (Sunday) 2:30 p.m.
    Rothenberg Hall
    Join best-selling author Andrea Wulf for a talk about the life of explorer, scientist, and early environmentalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859), the subject of her most recent book, The Invention of Nature. Her talk will focus on Humboldt’s explorations of Latin America. No reservations required.


    Wark Lecture (Free)

    Seeing and Knowing: Visions of Latin American Nature, ca.1492–1859
    Oct. 16 (Monday) 7:30 p.m.
    Rothenberg Hall
    Historian Daniela Bleichmar, co-curator of the exhibition, discusses the surprising and little-known story of the pivotal role that Latin America played in the pursuit of science and art during the first global era. A book signing and coffee reception will follow the talk. No reservations required.


    Free Lecture

    Cochineal in the History of Art and Global Trade
    Dec. 10 (Sunday) 2:30 p.m.
    Rothenberg Hall
    Alejandro de Ávila Blomberg of the Oaxaca Ethnobotanical Garden and Oaxaca Textile Museum will explore the historical and cultural significance of this natural crimson dye. Used from antiquity, cochineal became Mexico’s second-most valued export after silver during the Spanish colonial period. No reservations required.


View all programs and additional images here

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By The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

Viburnum opulus, Guelder rose [Viburnum opulus Linnaeus, Caprifoliaceae], hand-colored micrograph on canvas by Rob Kesseler (1951–), 2008, reproduced by permission of the artist. This detail of a leaf shows the stellate hairs (110× magnification).

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation presents “Worlds Within,” a
unique collaboration between the Hunt Institute (September 22 to December 15, 2017) and the Miller Gallery (September 23 to November 12, 2017). The two venues, at either end of the Carnegie Mellon University campus, are exhibiting botanical micrographs by British artist Rob Kesseler (1951-) alongside botanical wall charts from Carl Ignaz Leopold Kny’s (1841–1916) series “Botanische Wandtafeln” (Berlin, Paul Parey, 1874-1911).


Opening receptions

The opening receptions on Friday, September 22 are open to the public (5:00-7:00 p.m. at the Institute; 6:00-8:00 p.m. at the Miller Gallery). Rob Kesseler will be attending both receptions (5:00-6:00 p.m. at the Institute; 6:15-8:00 p.m. at the Miller Gallery).


Panel discussion

A panel discussion, “The artist in the lab, the scientist in the studio,” will be held on Thursday, September 28, 5:00-6:30 p.m. at the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, College of Fine Arts, Room CFA-111, Carnegie Mellon University. Rob Kesseler, “Worlds Within” artist, and Steve Tonsor, Director of Science and Research, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, and moderator Edith Doron, Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow, Senior Manager of Carnegie Nexus, Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh will discuss the evolution of relationships between artists and scientists into research partnerships and will consider potential avenues for the intersections of these two disciplines in the future. This event is free and open to the public. For information, contact the STUDIO.

[Sclereids (support cells) in Fig. 1. Humulus lupulus Linnaeus, Cannabaceae; Fig. 2. Deutzia scabra Thunberg, Hydrangeaceae; Fig. 3. Nuphar lutea (Linnaeus) Smith, Nymphaeaceae], color lithograph by W. A. Meyn (fl.1874–1911), 81.5 × 66 cm, after an original by Carl Ignaz Leopold Kny (1841–1916) and C. Müller (fl.ca.1874–1911) for Kny, Botanische Wandtafeln (Berlin, Paul Parey, 1874–1911, pl. 7), HI Art accession no. 6699.007.


About the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation. To this end, the Institute acquires and maintains authoritative collections of books, plant images, manuscripts, portraits and data files, and provides publications and other modes of information service. The Institute meets the reference needs of botanists, biologists, historians, conservationists, librarians, bibliographers and the public at large, especially those concerned with any aspect of the North American flora.



Related

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Next month award-winning botanical artist Jean Emmons, fiber artist Claire B. Jones, and photographer/artist Tara McDermott will present their work in the Koch Gallery at the Vashon Center for the Arts on Vashon Island. Their work will be on view June 2-29, 2017. Meet the artists on Friday, June 2 from 6-9 pm.


Now at Exhibitions to Visit
:

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ASBA Reed-Turner Artists’ Circle

The Reed-Turner Artists’ Circle and the Long Grove-Kildeer Garden Club are pleased to announce the 12th Annual Botanical Art Exhibition & Plant Sale at the Reed-Turner Woodland and Nature Preserve, 3849 Old McHenry Rd. Long Grove, IL (map). The exhibition is scheduled for May 20-21, 2017 from 10am to 3pm. It will feature original works, prints, cards and decorative items for sale. Admission is free.

The Reed-Turner Artists’ Circle consists of dedicated botanical artists from throughout the Chicago-area. The Group is guided by the parameters and goals of the American Society of Botanical Artists (ASBA), one of the premier organizations promoting botanical art around the world. Consistent with ASBA’s mission, the Group works to further the interest in botanical art, conservation science, botany, and horticulture at the local level. The Group also strives to emphasize the beauty and importance plants play in our daily lives by increasing public awareness through education, promotion, and exhibition of its members’ art in collaboration with local institutions.

The ASBA Reed-Turner Artists’ Circle meets at the Reed-Turner Woodland and Nature Preserve on the last Saturday of each month from 9:30-11:30 am. Members of the public with an interest in botanical art are most welcome.


Learn more about the Reed-Turner Artists’ Circle

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The Minnetonka Center for the Arts invites you to Beauty and Truth: Botanical Art Then and Now, a conversation about the past, present and future of botanical art. Guest speaker Kathy Allen, Andersen Horticultural Librarian at the University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, will be joined by contemporary botanical artists who will show how botanical drawings and paintings are created. You will also view artwork juried into Flora and Fauna Illustrata, a program documenting plants, insects and animals that live or pass through the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum.

Beauty and Truth: Botanical Art Then and Now will occur Saturday, March 4, 2017 from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. Reservations are required. Enrollment is limited to 30 (ages 16 and up). Cost: $14 members, $16 non-members.

View Details / Register



Related

While at Minnetonka Center for the Arts, don’t miss an exhibition of botanical art by the students of Suz Galloway. The exhibition Contemporary American Botanicals is on view in the Murphy Room through March 30, 2017. More Info

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By Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation presents
Exquisite Patterns in Nature from March 19 – June 30, 2017. This exhibition includes selections of artwork and books from the Hunt Institute’s permanent collections that are representative of, or inspired by, the fascinating configurations in the architecture of all organisms.

The patterns on display include simple symmetries and more complex tessellations and fractals; growth rings, whorls and logarithmic spirals; explorations of larger patterns observed through groupings of like plants and plant parts; the visual study of plants in complex decorative arrangements and examples of these patterns in practice.

    Opening reception
    Join us Sunday, March 19, 2017, 2-4 p.m. for the reception. At 2:30 p.m. the curators will give a short introduction to the exhibition in the gallery.

    Open House 2017
    Our annual Open House on Sunday, June 25 (1:45-4:30 p.m.) will include a talk (2:00-3:00 p.m.) and an exhibition tour (3:15-4:00 p.m.). Librarian Charlotte Tancin will present A celebration of plants, enjoying endless variety of form and kind, a talk and display from the Institute’s rare book collection. Striking historical illustrations of selected kinds of plants or aspects of their forms will be on display. She will talk briefly about each image, discussing what can be seen in the image and how the published image would have supported the work of botanists at the time, such as in floristic studies, reports of explorations, monographs on a family or genus, documenting new introductions or celebrating exotic garden plants. This event is free and open to the public.

[Insect- and wind-borne pollen of Dicotyledoneae and Monocotyledoneae], watercolor on paper by Anne Ophelia Todd Dowden (1907–2007), ca.1990, 25 × 17.5 cm, for her The Clover and the Bee: A Book of Pollination (New York, Thomas Crowell, 1990, p. 12), HI Art accession no. 7408.39, Rights, except gift industry, held by Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation.

[Insect- and wind-borne pollen of Dicotyledoneae and Monocotyledoneae], watercolor on paper by Anne Ophelia Todd Dowden (1907–2007), ca.1990, 25 × 17.5 cm, for her The Clover and the Bee: A Book of Pollination (New York, Thomas Crowell, 1990, p. 12), HI Art accession no. 7408.39, Rights, except gift industry, held by Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation.


About the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation. To this end, the Institute acquires and maintains authoritative collections of books, plant images, manuscripts, portraits and data files, and provides publications and other modes of information service. The Institute meets the reference needs of botanists, biologists, historians, conservationists, librarians, bibliographers and the public at large, especially those concerned with any aspect of the North American flora.

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The Lake Oswego Festival of the Arts in Lake Oswego, Oregon invites you to participate in Beyond the Point: The Fine Art of Colored Pencil and Graphite.

Colored pencil and graphite artists are invited to submit work showing how they apply colored pencil &/or graphite to a variety of surfaces including, but not limited to paper, wood, stone and board. Work may be 2D or 3D. Both colored and graphite, dry and water-soluble pencils may be used. This special exhibition will feature local and national artists such as Mary McCarty, Pat Averill, and Tracy Frein.

Beyond the Point is one of three juried exhibitions planned for the 54th Annual Lake Oswego Festival of the Arts (June 23-25, 2017). Below is an overview of all exhibiting opportunities:

    Beyond the Point: The Fine Art of Colored Pencil and Graphite
    Special exhibition featuring works in colored pencil and graphite.


    The Artist’s Vision: The Skies Opened

    The Artist’s Vision juried exhibition is a popular venue for both emerging and established artists in the 2D and 3D arts.


    Craft in the Park: Fine Art and Craft

    This is an outdoor booth show located in Lake Oswego’s George Rogers Park showcasing original handcrafted fine art and craft in fifteen categories.

View Exhibition Info / Deadlines



About the Lake Oswego Festival of the Arts

The Festival, an event created by Lakewood Center for the Arts, is a major regional arts event located in Lake Oswego, Oregon. Lake Oswego is located 9 miles south of Portland, Oregon. The Festival presents the creative endeavors of recognized and emerging artists and enjoys an outstanding reputation for bringing special exhibits of quality and diversity to a weekend that is accessible to everyone. Attracting some 25,000 visitors during the three day event, the Festival includes several art exhibits, food booths, music, and fine art crafts. The Festival is held in the Lakewood Center for the Arts in Lake Oswego and George Rogers Park. It features multiple art exhibits, music, dance and demonstrations. The special exhibit is housed at Lakewood Center. Other art exhibits (Open Show, Lake Oswego Chronicle, Artist’s Vision and Student Exhibits) are also located at Lakewood Center. Craft in the Park, with more than 110 artists, is located at George Rogers Park across the street from Lakewood Center.

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