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Archive for the ‘botanical art’ Category

Lady Finger Bananas, watercolor. © 2018 Sally Jacobs, all rights reserved

Sunday’s at the
Farmers Market

tag Gallery
Los Angeles, CA
April 17 – May 12, 2018

Contemporary botanical artist, Sally Jacobs, continues her exploration of Los Angeles’ farmers market in Sundays at the Farmers Market.

A watercolor artist and foodie, Sally visits the farmers market weekly to select specimens that inspire creativity in both her studio and her kitchen.

Sally’s paintings have been on exhibit in juried shows in New York and San Francisco, and at museums in New York, Minneapolis, and Phoenix. She was an award-winner at the Brand 37 Works on Paper exhibition at the Brand Library and Art Gallery and is one of the artists featured in Today’s Botanical Artists, a book about botanical artists in North America.

Meet Sally at the opening reception on Saturday, April 21, 2018 (5-8 pm). Learn from Sally during her Artists’ Talk scheduled for Saturday, April 28 from 3-4 pm.

Interested in trying botanical art yourself? Sally will teach you How to Draw a Leaf on Saturday, May 5 from 1-3 pm. Contact Sally to reserve your place in class. Class size is limited.

Visit the tag Gallery at 5458 Wilshire Blvd, Los Angeles, CA. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Sunday, 11 am – 5 pm. (View Map)



Related

Read a review of Today’s Botanical Artists and learn from the artists featured in this book (begin here).

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Plant Prints & Earth Paintings
Tina Scopa
An Tobar
Isle of Mull, Scotland
March 3-30, 2018

This past summer we learned about edaphic plant art when we spoke with Scottish artist Tina Scopa. Working spontaneously with plants and soil, Tina gets plants to “draw” themselves in prints, photography, and ceramic work. Her current exhibition titled, Plant Prints & Earth Paintings, represents four years of exploring plants and soil. Images from this show are below.

During our conversation with Tina, we also learned she was working on her fine art degree at the Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design at the University of Dundee. I am happy to share that Tina has almost completed her studies and is working on her degree show.

While we wait for her degree show, we can learn more about Tina’s practice and about what motivates her to create edaphic plant art by reading her paper about environmental art (also called land art or ecological art).

In a living understanding of nature, Tina asks the question:

    Can a contemporary art practice reconnect society to the “rhythms, sights, sounds, and scents of the natural world”?

To answer this question, Tina researched experiential knowledge and experiential understanding through art. If you have an interest in learning how art might be used in environmental education, you will enjoy Tina’s paper.

The exhibition Plant Prints & Earth Paintings is now on view at An Tobar on the Isle of Mull. Click on the first image to begin a tour of the exhibition.

All photos are courtesy of Tina Scopa.



Related

Kick-off the spring season with this class by Botanical Dimensions:

© Donna Torres, Brugmansia sanguinea

Botanical Illustration
The Art of Seeing, Drawing and Painting Plants

A 2-day workshop with artists Donna Torres and Kathleen Harrison
Occidental Center for the Arts
Botanical Dimensions
Occidental, CA
March 3-4, 2018
10 AM – 4 PM

This 2-day weekend workshop will focus on the accurate representation of plants in graphite and watercolor. Kathleen Harrison will lead the first day of drawing. We will introduce how to see the form of a plant, review tools and materials, and will each make a graphite drawing of a plant. Donna Torres will teach the second day, teaching specific watercolor techniques used in botanical art, color theory and special techniques to bring life into your plant illustration. You may register for the entire weekend, or choose one of the days, as space allows.

View additional information and registration options on the class website.



About Botanical Dimensions

Founded in 1985 by Kathleen Harrison and Terence McKenna, Botanical Dimensions collects and protects plants of ethnographic-medical significance and their lore, educates people about plants and mushrooms, and preserves ecosystems and traditions of ecological knowledge. Learn more at www.botanicaldimensions.org

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Ann S. Hoffenberg, Paperbark Maple (2017), Acer griseum, Rutgers Gardens, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Watercolor on paper, 9 x 13 inches. © Ann S. Hoffenberg. Courtesy of the American Society of Botanical Artists and the New York Botanical Garden.



Save the date!

The third triennial exhibition by the New York Botanical Garden and the American Society of Botanical Artists is coming to Southern California.

Out of the Woods: Celebrating Trees in Public Gardens, will be at
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens from May 19 through August 27, 2018. This exhibition will be on view in the Flora-Legium Gallery at the Brody Botanical Center.

This juried exhibition includes 43 artworks in watercolor, oil, graphite, colored pencil, and ink, depicting everything from seedpods to bark to an entire forest floor.

“Out of the Woods” highlights the role public gardens and arboreta play in engaging visitors with trees and their ecological and utilitarian roles. It also underscores the conservation, research, and scholarship occurring at these public institutions.
 
“By bringing these subjects to life through their work, this extraordinary group of botanical artists creates new pathways for communicating the beauty and value of plants to contemporary life,” said James Folsom, the Telleen/Jorgensen Director of the Botanical Gardens at The Huntington. “I can’t think of a more critical time than now to be hosting this show and talking about this topic.”

A catalog will accompany the exhibition. It will be available for purchase at the Huntington Store.

Drop-in family activities about botanical art will be offered in the Brody Botanical Center every Saturday and Sunday throughout the exhibition. Family activities will be led by members of the Botanical Artists’ Guild of Southern California (BAGSC) from noon to 4 p.m.

Also on view in the Brody Botanical Center will be Amazing Trees, a BAGSC adjunct exhibition featuring the work of local contemporary botanical artists.


About The Huntington

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution serving scholars and the general public. It is located at 1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino, CA (map).



Related

This exhibition will travel to St. Charles, MO then Tucson, AZ and then to Chaska, MN after its stop at The Huntington. Learn more at Exhibitions to Visit.

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By The Philadelphia Society of Botanical Illustrators


The Philadelphia Society of Botanical Illustrators (PSBI) is presenting a unique fine art exhibit at the 2018 Philadelphia International Flower Show, March 3-11. This exhibit includes a gallery of botanical art and artists’ demonstrations. Botanical art combines science and artistic interpretation to create pleasing, accurate depictions of plants and flowers.

The theme this year is Wet Feet: Plants That Live in a Watery World. Plants that have “wet feet” live in or along places like bogs, lakes, rivers, streams, estuaries, swamps and marshes around the world. Look for the artist’s signage with their artwork that identifies the plant and its habitat, and why the artist chose it.

The PSBI artists have been demonstrating the techniques of botanical art at the Philadelphia Flower Show since 1998, one year after PSBI was formed. Their demonstrations are part of the PSBI mission to educate the public on the intricacies of botanical art. It is an art form that is a tradition particularly in the Philadelphia area: in the 18th Century John and William Bartram founded and illustrated North America’s first botanical garden.

The PSBI is the local non-profit professional organization for botanical art. It sponsors art classes for youth, and its members teach botanical art in multiple venues.

For more information, visit the PSBI website or contact Amy Stewart.

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No. 11, Rhubarb, Ruibarbo blanco, Cedros [Jatropha podagrica Hooker, Euphorbiaceae], watercolor on paper by Charles Dorat (?1806–ca.1870), 30 × 23.5 cm, HI Art accession no. 5683.11.

Dr. Charles Dorat and His Unrealized Central American Medicinal Flora
Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation
Pittsburgh, PA
April 2 – June 29, 2018

Charles Dorat (?1806-ca.1870) was a European physician and naturalist who lived in El Salvador and traveled in Honduras between 1850 and 1870. Acquainted with Central American medical professionals, government officials and companies interested in material medica, it is thought Dorat was hired by companies because of his knowledge of mining and economic plants.

While in Central America, Dorat pursued interests in nature and art, and by 1860 had painted 150 watercolors of useful plants. These paintings were supposed to be published as a flora of Central America, but Dorat appears to have died around 1870.

Learn more about Dr. Charles Dorat at Dr. Charles Dorat and His Unrealized Central American Medicinal Flora.



About The Hunt Institute

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation. To this end, the Institute acquires and maintains authoritative collections of books, plant images, manuscripts, portraits and data files, and provides publications and other modes of information service. The Institute meets the reference needs of botanists, biologists, historians, conservationists, librarians, bibliographers and the public at large, especially those concerned with any aspect of the North American flora.

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From The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

Antonio García Cubas (1832–1912), agricultural map in Atlas pintoresco é historico de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos, (Picturesque and historical atlas of the United States of Mexico), Mexico City: Debray Sucesores, 1885, chromolithograph, 24 13/16 × 30 11/16 in. The Newberry Library, Chicago, Ayer 655.59.G2. Copyright © The Huntington


Visual Voyages:
Images of Latin American Nature from Columbus to Darwin

Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
MaryLou and George Boone Gallery
San Marino, CA
September 16, 2017 – January 8, 2018


Visual Voyages
looks at how indigenous peoples, Europeans, Spanish Americans, and individuals of mixed-race descent depicted natural phenomena for a range of purposes and from a variety of perspectives: artistic, cultural, religious, commercial, medical, and scientific. The exhibition examines the period that falls roughly between Christopher Columbus’s first voyage in 1492 and Charles Darwin’s publication of On the Origin of Species in 1859, a work based largely on Darwin’s own voyage to the region in the 1830s.

“Information and materials circulated at an unprecedented rate as people transformed their relationship to the natural world and to each other,” said Daniela Bleichmar, associate professor of art history and history at the University of Southern California (USC) and co-curator of the exhibition. “Images served not only as artistic objects of great beauty but also as a means of experiencing, understanding and possessing the natural world. These depictions circulated widely and allowed viewers—then and now—to embark on their own ‘visual voyages’.”

Bleichmar, who was born in Argentina and raised in Mexico, is an expert on the history of science, art, and cultural contact in the early modern period. Her publications include the prize-winning book Visible Empire: Botanical Expeditions and Visual Culture in the Hispanic Enlightenment (University of Chicago Press, 2012).

An exhibition catalog will be available beginning September 2017. Published by Yale University Press in association with The Huntington, the 240-page book contains 153 color illustrations ($50.00).

Visual Voyages is an international loan exhibition that is part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative, an exploration of Latin American and Latino art involving more than 70 arts institutions across southern California. Gallery text will be in Spanish and English.


About The Huntington

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens is a collections-based research and educational institution serving scholars and the general public. More information about The Huntington can be found online at huntington.org.


Several programs and exhibitions will be occur in conjunction with this exhibition. Artists, naturalists, and educators may be especially interest in:

    Visual Voyages in the Gardens
    Sept 16, 2017–Jan 8, 2018
    Throughout the Botanical Gardens
    Visitors can enrich their experience of “Visual Voyages” by strolling the botanical gardens in search of the real-life specimens of plants they have seen depicted in the gallery. Keep your eyes peeled for two dozen “Visual Voyages” signs, pointing to cacao, pineapple, tobacco, and other plants indigenous to Latin America.


    In Pursuit of Flora: 18th-Century: Botanical Drawings from The Huntington’s Art Collections

    Oct. 28, 2017 – Feb. 19, 2018
    Huntington Art Gallery, Works on Paper Room
    European exploration of other lands during the so-called Age of Discovery revealed a vast new world of plant life that required description, cataloging, and recording. By the 18th century, the practice of botanical illustration had become an essential tool in the study of natural history. From lusciously detailed drawings of fruit and flowers by Georg Dionysius Ehret (1708–1770), a collaborator of Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus, to depictions of more exotic examples by Matilda Conyers (1753–1803), “In Pursuit of Flora” reveals 18th-century European appreciation for the beauty of the natural world.


    Free Talk and Book Signing

    The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World
    Oct. 15 (Sunday) 2:30 p.m.
    Rothenberg Hall
    Join best-selling author Andrea Wulf for a talk about the life of explorer, scientist, and early environmentalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859), the subject of her most recent book, The Invention of Nature. Her talk will focus on Humboldt’s explorations of Latin America. No reservations required.


    Wark Lecture (Free)

    Seeing and Knowing: Visions of Latin American Nature, ca.1492–1859
    Oct. 16 (Monday) 7:30 p.m.
    Rothenberg Hall
    Historian Daniela Bleichmar, co-curator of the exhibition, discusses the surprising and little-known story of the pivotal role that Latin America played in the pursuit of science and art during the first global era. A book signing and coffee reception will follow the talk. No reservations required.


    Free Lecture

    Cochineal in the History of Art and Global Trade
    Dec. 10 (Sunday) 2:30 p.m.
    Rothenberg Hall
    Alejandro de Ávila Blomberg of the Oaxaca Ethnobotanical Garden and Oaxaca Textile Museum will explore the historical and cultural significance of this natural crimson dye. Used from antiquity, cochineal became Mexico’s second-most valued export after silver during the Spanish colonial period. No reservations required.


View all programs and additional images here

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