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Opens Next Week!

The viewing of Following in the Bartrams’ Footsteps at the UC Botanical Garden at Berkeley will be the only West Coast showing of this traveling exhibition by the American Society of Botanical Artists. The Garden has planned special programs related to the exhibition. Information about these programs and other learning opportunities in botanical art can be viewed below and at Classes Near You > Northern California.


University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley

http://botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu
This 34-acre garden was established in 1890 and is now a non-profit research garden and museum. The botanical art classes at UCBG are taught by Lee McCaffree and Catherine Watters. View a detailed schedule and register on the Garden’s website.

    EXHIBITIONS

    Following in the Bartrams’ FootstepsBartram_cover_500px
    December 15, 2014 – February 15, 2015
    Open Daily | 10 am – 4 pm
    This major art exhibition includes forty-four original artworks based on the native plant discoveries made by John and William Bartram in their renowned and influential travels throughout the Eastern wilderness between the 1730s and 1790s. The UC Botanical Garden will be the only West Coast showing of this exhibition. On view in the new Julia Morgan Hall.
    Free with Garden Admission

    PLANTS ILLUSTRATED: Following the Garden’s Path
    January 7 –  February 15, 2015
    10 am – 4 pm
    Come view our 6th annual Plants Illustrated exhibition of Botanical Art featuring work by the Northern California Society of Botanical Artists.  This year the pieces will represent plants in the Garden’s collection.
    Free with Garden Admission

    Plants Illustrated: Opening Reception for Garden Members and NCSBA Artists
    Saturday, January 24, 2015
    4:30 pm – 6:30 pm
    Come view our annual exhibition of botanical art, Plants Illustrated at this special members’ event. Meet the artists, sip wine and learn about the Northern California Society of Botanical Artists.  Free; card-holding members only; advance registration is required; space is limited.


    WORKSHOPS

    An Introduction to Botanical Art with Catherine Watters
    Thursday, January 22, 2015 &
    Friday, January 23, 2015
    10 am – 4 pm
    This class will introduce you to the fascinating world of Botanical Art. Catherine Watters will teach you to observe, measure and draw plants in great detail and with botanical accuracy. Students will work with graphite, colored pencil and watercolors.
    All levels are welcome.
    $180 / $170 members

    Botanical Art for Young Adults
    Saturday, February 7, 2015
    1 pm – 3 pm
    Join artist and educator Sally Petru for an afternoon investigation to learn to draw both botanically accurate and artful representations of plants. All levels are welcome and parents/guardians are welcome to register as students alongside their child. $40 / $30 members


    LECTURES

    The Legacy of the Bartrams with Carol Woodin,
    ASBA Exhibitions Director

    Friday, December 19, 2014
    10 am – 11:30 am
    Who were John and William Bartram? Come learn about this fascinating father-son duo and the legacy they’ve had on American botany, horticulture and botanical art. Free with Garden Admission

    The Venus Fly trap and other Amazing Carnivorous Plants
    Saturday, January 10, 2015
    10 am – 11 am
    John Bartram was the first to introduce the Venus Fly Trap into cultivation. Family members of all age are invited to discover some of the fascinating and beautiful plants that can eat insects. Get up close with the amazing leaf adaptations as you learn more
    about them. $15 / $10 members

    A Journey with the Bartrams, Hookers and other Famous Families in Western Botanical Science, Art and Exploration with Dr. Peggy Fiedler
    Saturday, January 31, 2015
    1 pm – 3 pm
    John Bartram and his son, William Bartram, were among the first active, professional American field botanists throughout the Revolutionary era. Father John (1699-1777) was an indefatigable collector of plants and seeds during his travels across eastern North America, eventually establishing arguably the first botanic garden in the New World. His son William (1739-1823) was similarly well-traveled, an avid collector, and an extraordinary artist of both plants and birds. At roughly the same time as the younger Bartram, William Jackson Hooker (1785-1865) was burnishing his credentials as an intrepid English explorer, keen botanist and accomplished illustrator as well as the third director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. His son, Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) too followed in his father’s footsteps, becoming one of the greatest British botanists of the 19th century, the 4th director of Kew, and Charles Darwin’s closest friend and confidante. Free with Garden Admission

    Maria Sibylla Merian: A Passion for Plants & Insects
    Thursday, February 5, 2015
    10 am – 11:30 am
    The artist and scientist Maria Sibylla Merian (1647-1717) was born in Frankfurt, Germany, into a middle-class family of publishers and artists. At the age of fifty-two, Merian traveled with her younger daughter to Suriname, a Dutch territory in South America, to paint its exotic insects. She was an adventurous woman way ahead of her time, whose amazing career as an artist, writer and teacher revolutionized botany and zoology. Come learn more about this fascinating woman. $12 / $10 members



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Welwitschia © 2006 Wilna Eloff. All rights reserved

Welwitschia © 2006 Wilna Eloff. All rights reserved

Wilna Eloff is a South African botanical artist whose specialty is indigenous trees and shrubs.

This weekend Wilna will open a solo exhibition at Gallery 91 in Somerset West. You are invited to attend the opening reception on Saturday, November 1, 2014.

Wilna is an award-winning artist who has earned several medals at the Kirstenbosch Biennale Awards (Gold Medals 2013, 2008, 2006; Silver 2010; Bronze 2004). Her work is in the collection at The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation at Carnegie Mellon University (USA), the Shirley Sherwood Gallery of Botanical Art at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (UK), and in the First Rand Corporate Art Gallery (South Africa).

Her artwork was commissioned for publication in Field Guide to the Orchids of Northern S.A. and Swaziland by Douglas McMurtry, Lourens Grobler, Jolisa Grobler and Shane Burns (2008). ISBN: 1-919766-46-4

Join Wilna this weekend at Gallery 91 to learn about rare and endangered indigenous plants. Here is a flyer you can download, print and share with friends.

Gallery 91 Expo

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By The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation invites you to view
Dangerous Beauty: Thorns, Spines and Prickles from September 18 to December 18, 2014. This exhibition includes artworks and books that depict the formidable and yet beautiful defensive structures of thorns, spines and prickles that have evolved to protect plants from predation. Featured are drawings, watercolors, prints and books displaying thistles, teasels, cacti, roses, berry brambles, stinging nettles and citrus trees.

The first step in appreciating these defensive structures is an understanding of what they are and how they differ from each other. In the most basic sense, thorns, spines and prickles can all refer to the sharp, stiff, woody defensive appendages found on some plants. Thorns are modified stems, as in Citrus Linnaeus. Spines are modified leaves, as in Echinocactus Link & Otto. Prickles differ in that they emerge from the epidermis, mesophyll or cortex of the plant, as in Rosa Linnaeus. Examples of these structures will be depicted in a variety of ways, from detailed scientific illustrations to loose interpretations, but all showing how beautiful these structures can be.

Left, Citron: Citrus medica [Citrus medica Linnaeus, Rutaceae], watercolor on paper by Marilena Pistoia (Italy), [pre-1984], 35 × 25.5 cm, for Laura Peroni, Il Linguaggio del Fiori (Milan, Arnoldo Mondadori, 1984, p. 53), HI Art accession no. 6773.20, © 1984 Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, Milan, All rights reserved. Center, Teasel [Dipsacus Linnaeus, Dipsacaceae], watercolor on paper by Celia Crampton (Africa/England), 2003, 37 × 28 cm, HI Art accession no. 7586, © 2003 Celia Crampton, All rights reserved. Right, Rosa canina L. [Rosa Linnaeus, Rosaceae], watercolor on paper by Petr Liska (Czech Republic), 1981, 24 × 16.5 cm, HI Art accession no. 6463, © 1981 Petr Liska, All rights reserved.

Left, Citron: Citrus medica [Citrus medica Linnaeus, Rutaceae], watercolor on paper by Marilena Pistoia (Italy), [pre-1984], 35 × 25.5 cm, for Laura Peroni, Il Linguaggio del Fiori (Milan, Arnoldo Mondadori, 1984, p. 53), HI Art accession no. 6773.20, © 1984 Arnoldo Mondadori Editore, Milan, All rights reserved.
Center, Teasel [Dipsacus Linnaeus, Dipsacaceae], watercolor on paper by Celia Crampton (Africa/England), 2003, 37 × 28 cm, HI Art accession no. 7586,
© 2003 Celia Crampton, All rights reserved.
Right, Rosa canina L. [Rosa Linnaeus, Rosaceae], watercolor on paper by Petr Liska (Czech Republic), 1981, 24 × 16.5 cm, HI Art accession no. 6463, © 1981 Petr Liska, All rights reserved.

Artists represented are Marie Angel (England, 1923–2010); Diana Carmichael (United Kingdom/South Africa, 1926–2010); Louis Claude de Chastillon (France, 1639–1734); Celia Crampton (Africa/England); Anne Ophelia Todd Dowden (United States, 1907–2007); Raymond Dowden (United States, 1905–1982); Georg Dionys Ehret (Germany/England, 1708–1770); Henry Evans (United States, 1918–1990); Alejandro Gavriloff (Estonia/Argentina, 1914–1993); Lucretia Hamilton (United States, 1908–1986); Charlotte Hannan (Germany/United States); Jeanne Russell Janish (also Mrs. Carl F. Janish; United States, 1902–1998); Christabel King (England); Carl Ignaz Leopold Kny (Germany, 1841–1916); Paul Landacre (United States, 1893–1963); Dorika Leyniers de Buyst (Belgium); Chrissie Lightfoot (England); Petr Liska (Czechoslovakia); Stanley Maltzman (United States); Yoshikaru Matsumura (Japan, 1906–1967); Roderick McEwen (Scotland, 1932–1982); Joan McGann (United States); Jeni Neale (also Jeni Barlow; England); Gunnar Normann (Sweden, 1912–2005); Marilena Pistoia (Italy); Frantisek Procházka (Czechoslovakia, 1911–1976); Pierre-Joseph Redouté (Belgium, 1759–1840); Elizabeth Rice (England); Nicolas Robert (France, 1614–1685); Christian Schkuhr (Germany, 1741–1811); Geraldine King Tam (United States); Gesina B. Threlkeld (Netherlands/United States); Unknown artist (Mexico, fl.1787–1803), Torner Collection of Sessé & Mociño Biological Illustrations; Unknown artist (United States, fl.1900s), USDA Forest Service Collection; Frederick Andrews Walpole (United States, 1861–1904). A selection of rare books from the Hunt Institute Library collection also is included in this exhibition.

Join us Thursday, September 18, 2014 from 5–7 PM for an opening reception. At 5:30 PM Assistant Curator of Art Carrie Roy will give a short introduction to the exhibition in the gallery. We will also open on Saturday, October 11, 1–4 pm, during Carnegie Mellon University’s Cèilidh Weekend festivities. Docent–led tours will be available throughout the afternoon.



Related

Cabinet of Curiosities
During Fall 2014, The Hunt’s Cabinet of Curiosities will highlight books from the Library’s collection featuring plants with thorns, spines and prickles. Humans are often undeterred by these sometimes pain-inducing plant features, finding that their sharpness can serve a purpose or that the plant is useful despite the pricks and jabs one might incur. Visit the Cabinet in the library’s lobby to explore how these plants have been utilized.

The exhibition will be on display on the 5th floor of the Hunt Library building at Carnegie Mellon University and will be open to the public free of charge.
Hours: Monday–Friday, 9 AM to Noon and 1–5 PM; Sunday, 1–4 PM (except November 23 and November 27-30). Because hours are subject to change, please call or email before your visit to confirm. For further information, contact the Hunt Institute at 412-268-2434.


About the Institute

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, a research division of Carnegie Mellon University, specializes in the history of botany and all aspects of plant science and serves the international scientific community through research and documentation. The Institute meets the reference needs of botanists, biologists, historians, conservationists, librarians, bibliographers and the public at large, especially those concerned with any aspect of the North American flora.

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By Philadelphia Society of Botanical Illustrators

Every year the Philadelphia Society of Botanical Illustrators is given the opportunity by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society to demonstrate our skills at the Philadelphia Flower Show. This is a wonderful chance for our organization to explain the fascination of botanical art to the world at large.

Some of the artists think this is great fun. But some do not. It is certainly different from the peace and quiet most of us experience when painting. People crowd around us. Small children want to see what we’re doing – up close. School groups ask endless good questions. It can be stressful.

It’s all a matter of attitude. The “best” attitude is that of a teacher who thinks that botanical art is the most fascinating subject in the world (which, of course, it is). You have to accept the obvious that there is no way that you’ll have the time to paint an entire watercolor. Maybe you can do a little work on one to show how laboriously slow it is. But do not expect to finish it. It is better to bring examples of your sketches, notes, drawings, tracings — whatever led up to the final artwork (which is shown on the wall behind us).

Instead of painting, your time will be taken up with talking to people: explaining how important it is to really “see” the plant, to understand how it grows and reproduces, to show aspects of the plant that photography cannot capture. You can possibly show how artists create form, a feeling of three dimensions. You might briefly touch on the long history of botanical art going back to the Egyptians. You must, however, talk in “sound bites.” Every sentence has to be a headline. And don’t be riled if your audience drifts away. Don’t expect to hold their attention.

You are there to rouse interest that might find an outlet at another time. Who knows? Your audience might someday take a botanical art class. They might become avid painters of wild flowers. They might even buy one of your botanical watercolors. But it’s not going to happen during the demonstration. So relax. Enjoy yourself. Stay calm and carry on.

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Morphology Preview copy

Five members of Amicus Botanicus, a painting group formed by graduates of the 2004 Botanical Painting Diploma Course at The English Gardening School, will take part in MOR.PHOLO.O.GY: An Exhibition of Botanical Art at the Sunbury Embroidery Gallery at Sunbury-on-Thames, near London. This exhibition opens on July 2, 2013 and will be on view through July 28, 2013.

Artist Louise Young says, “The gallery is a delightful little modern gallery within a lovely walled garden in the middle of Sunbury. It is close to Hampton Court Palace where the flower show will be held in July.”

In this exhibition, artists Linda McDonald, Mary Ellen Taylor, Louise Young, Caroline Jenkins and Shirley Slocock share their views of the natural world.

Be sure to also add to your calendar the presentation about orchids in art by Dr. Phillip Cribb, former Deputy Director and Herbarium Curator at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Dr. Cribb is the co-author of A Very Victorian Passion: The Orchid Paintings by John Day, a book about orchid enthusiast, John Day (1824-1888). This very inspiring book contains a sample of the more than 2,300 orchids painted by Day that are housed at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Dr. Cribb wrote this book with Michael Tibbs in 2004.

Mor.phol.o.gy

Sunbury Embroidery Gallery
Sunbury-on-Thames, England
July 2-28, 2013

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The Society of Floral Painters will celebrate the launch of their 2013 exhibition on June 1. The exhibition will be held at the National Trust Property – The Vyne from June 1-23, 2013. Gallery hours are 12-5 PM Monday to Friday
and 11 AM – 4 PM Saturday and Sunday.

The Vyne is located at Vyne Road, Sherbourne St. John, Basingstoke, Hampshire RG24 9HL. Click on the poster for directions.

Click for directions

Click for directions


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On Saturday, the 11th Biennial Exhibition of Botanical Art opens at the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne. Featuring over 150 pieces of art by Australian and international artists, this show will be on view through November 23, 2012.

Lectures and special classes will be held in conjunction with this exhibition:

  • Seeds: Why What You Eat Matters – November 14
  • Botanical Art Masterclass with Hillary Parker – November 18
  • Exhibition Tea & Tour – November 13 & November 22

For more information, visit the exhibition page of the Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne.



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Botanical Art Program at RBG Melbourne

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